Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

This evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes does not have to be a progressive

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • This evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes does not have to be a progressive

    This evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes does not have to be a progressive and irreversible disease. It is clearly a treatable disease when an effective lifestyle intervention is used.


    Ok so thought I would open some discussion on this .
    I remember in the past that type 2 D was regarded as progressive and irreversible . Modern thought seems to be moving away from this .

    There are many people onsite with this issue and pre diabetes .

    Remember guys no commercial links


  • #2
    I'm about 4 months into the medication cycle of mine with a hopeful mindset that i can reverse it as im only 32...
    However the natural method for me and weight loss is next to impossible..
    It's not impossible but if i want to enjoy my life medication is necessary..
    I was always into sport as a teenager, a physical labourers job and went to the gym 5 days a week for over 10 years..
    During this time with all that extra curricular activity i sat at around 95kg...
    I was happy with that weight at 176 cm or 5 foot 9..
    The minute i stopped just one of those activities i would gain weight and rapidly.
    Too put this into perspective on the xmas holidays from work i could gain upto 25kg in 3 weeks some years.
    I'm currently trailing some sort of weight loss injection pen..
    Its working and its working well..
    I do however have a second issue and that's low testosterone...
    They are possibly the worst 2 combinations in terms of weight loss...
    Now add lockdown into the mix i can't play tennis go to the gym it's not even recommended to walk around the block atm...
    All i can say that it is possible to naturally reverse the process for MOST people but you need to weigh up the cost and toll it has on your standard of living
    25th june 2020: BPEL 14cm x EG 11cm (NBPEL 11.5cm) NBPFL 8.5cm x FG 10cm
    5th August 2020: BPEL 16.5cm x EG 13cm (NBPEL 14.5cm) NBPFL 10cm x FG 10.5cm
    25th september: ??
    Goal 18cmx16cm
    https://www.pegym.com/forums/progres...eekly-log.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you tried fasting?

      Comment


      • #4
        Fasting is great until you eat again..
        I doubt there is a thing you can suggest i haven't tried.
        Vegan
        Vego
        Palio
        Small meals at a higher intake
        Small meals at a lower intake
        Weight loss tablets (all they do is dry your water up)
        Soup diet
        Weight watchers
        Light n easy
        One meal a day
        Two meals a day
        6 meals a day
        Liquids only
        At some point you just accept your body not making insulin at the required rate plus a low testosterone level is not manageable for a life of a laymen..
        If i was a professional athlete on a strict training schedule it would be possible naturally..
        I don't have the funding or dedication nor want to sacrifice that much of my life to achieve what's considered healthy.
        I also acknowledge that even after a strict routine like that once i ceased to do it my body would revert back to "normal"
        This is me personally if your test level is normal unlike mine you have less of an excuse but i still sympathise with you if you choose medication.
        25th june 2020: BPEL 14cm x EG 11cm (NBPEL 11.5cm) NBPFL 8.5cm x FG 10cm
        5th August 2020: BPEL 16.5cm x EG 13cm (NBPEL 14.5cm) NBPFL 10cm x FG 10.5cm
        25th september: ??
        Goal 18cmx16cm
        https://www.pegym.com/forums/progres...eekly-log.html

        Comment


        • #5
          There are those that need medication and those who choose it.

          Comment


          • #6
            A meta-analysis from 2017 found that low-carb diets reduced the need for diabetes medication and also improved certain bio-markers in people with type 2 diabetes. This included reductions in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), triglycerides, and blood pressure; and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, sometimes called the “good” cholesterol.
            26
            Additionally, in a non-randomized trial from Virta Health, the intervention group of subjects with type 2 diabetes followed a very low-carb diet and received remote monitoring by physicians and health coaches. After one year, 94% of those in the low-carb group had reduced or stopped their insulin use. Furthermore, 25% had an HgbA1c in the normal range without needing any medications, suggesting their disease was in remission, and an additional 35% did the same with only metformin. At the two-year mark, a high proportion of subjects continued to demonstrate sustained improvements in glycemic control.
            27
            This evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes does not have to be a progressive and irreversible disease. It is clearly a treatable disease when an effective lifestyle intervention is used.


            6. A message of hope

            As recently as 50 years ago, type 2 diabetes was extremely rare. Now, around the world, the number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a worldwide epidemic.
            In the past, type 2 diabetes was thought to be a progressive disease with no hope for reversal or remission. People were — and sometimes still are — taught to “manage” type 2 diabetes, rather than to try to reverse the underlying process.
            But now people with type 2 diabetes can hope to regain their health! Today we know that the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes — high blood sugar and high insulin — can often be reversed with a very low-carb diet.
            People don’t just have to “manage” their diabetes as it progresses. Instead, they can often lower their blood sugar to normal levels with diet alone, and may be able to avoid or discontinue most medications.
            Normal blood sugar levels and fewer or no medications likely means no progression of disease, and no progression of complications. People with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes may be able to live long, healthy lives, with toes, eyesight, and kidneys intact!
            If you are not on any medications, you can start your journey back to health today.

            Last edited by Pegasus; 07-19-2020, 06:12 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 6and4.2 View Post
              Fasting is great until you eat again..
              I doubt there is a thing you can suggest i haven't tried.
              Vegan
              Vego
              Palio
              Small meals at a higher intake
              Small meals at a lower intake
              Weight loss tablets (all they do is dry your water up)
              Soup diet
              Weight watchers
              Light n easy
              One meal a day
              Two meals a day
              6 meals a day
              Liquids only
              At some point you just accept your body not making insulin at the required rate plus a low testosterone level is not manageable for a life of a laymen..
              If i was a professional athlete on a strict training schedule it would be possible naturally..
              I don't have the funding or dedication nor want to sacrifice that much of my life to achieve what's considered healthy.
              I also acknowledge that even after a strict routine like that once i ceased to do it my body would revert back to "normal"
              This is me personally if your test level is normal unlike mine you have less of an excuse but i still sympathise with you if you choose medication.
              Have you tried the 5:2 or even 4:3 fasting, where you eat normal (moderate) 5 days a week, and on 2 nonconsecutive days fast (max. 800 kcals) - it has been documented to have 3 significant effects:
              - your average calorie intake drops, so you lose weight. Perhaps slow, but sustainable and not the yoyo way
              - your hormonal balance gets rubbed, and your insulin sensitivity gets better ( your blood sugar levels get more stable)
              - your bad cholesterol drops

              Best of all, it's easy, because it is only two separate days a week, and you choose from week to week which days, so your social life and and other plans don't get affected. Don't fast and train heavy on the same day for instance. The hard part is not to overeat the following day. In time your hunger and the feeling of being fed will change. It is not a strenuous plan, and you can keep it as a life style for years. English doctor Mosley has written a couple of books on it, and made some British TV-shows on it.
              Last edited by Ehhhm; 07-19-2020, 06:26 AM.
              Starting ADS januar 2018 at 5.3 BPEL and 5.3 EG
              Current and still (end of 2020) at 7.1 BPEL and 6.1 EG
              Goal 7.5 BPEL and 5.9 EG

              Comment


              • #8
                Haven't tried it in those exact measures perhaps i will in the future.
                Also do you have a progress log for your pe?
                25th june 2020: BPEL 14cm x EG 11cm (NBPEL 11.5cm) NBPFL 8.5cm x FG 10cm
                5th August 2020: BPEL 16.5cm x EG 13cm (NBPEL 14.5cm) NBPFL 10cm x FG 10.5cm
                25th september: ??
                Goal 18cmx16cm
                https://www.pegym.com/forums/progres...eekly-log.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 6and4.2 View Post
                  Haven't tried it in those exact measures perhaps i will in the future.
                  Also do you have a progress log for your pe?
                  I don't have a log here, but been writing a bit in my tread on the success forum, bot on progress and my technique. It is called "man, it really works".
                  And i have some curves of gain/time in my pictures
                  Last edited by Ehhhm; 07-19-2020, 06:39 AM.
                  Starting ADS januar 2018 at 5.3 BPEL and 5.3 EG
                  Current and still (end of 2020) at 7.1 BPEL and 6.1 EG
                  Goal 7.5 BPEL and 5.9 EG

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am an older guy who is very fit, very active and doesn't eat horribly. Not sure what my numbers would be if I didn't take anything, but right now I am on Metformin (1000 mg twice daily) and Glimepiride (1mg once daily). They keep my A1c down around an average of 6.5 - 8. I could definitely eat fewer carbs, but other than that, I don't have a lot of other options. While I know too high a A1c count can lead to organ failures, outwardly I feel absolutely no different when I am below my average low or a little above my average high.
                    FL 6.0"/MFG 5.75", BPEL 7.00"/MEG 6.5"


                    The Ultimate Jelq (The UJ)
                    The Ultimate V (The UV)
                    Testicle Jelq (The TJ)
                    Heated Bundled LAS
                    Ultimate Warmup Exercise

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't notice anything either. And mine was described as alarmingly high noth BS and CLR
                      Also take metformin 2000mg a day.
                      25th june 2020: BPEL 14cm x EG 11cm (NBPEL 11.5cm) NBPFL 8.5cm x FG 10cm
                      5th August 2020: BPEL 16.5cm x EG 13cm (NBPEL 14.5cm) NBPFL 10cm x FG 10.5cm
                      25th september: ??
                      Goal 18cmx16cm
                      https://www.pegym.com/forums/progres...eekly-log.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        regular exercise, avoid weight gain, and keeping the A1c less than 7.0. will help. There are a host of medications available to help with control.

                        If your want to cheat, a little bit, not a lot.
                        Valued Member of 11 years at the PEGym
                        Looks are deceiving, mirrors don't lie.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So 6 I understand you are trying to lose weight do you think that will help ? What weight are you aiming for ?

                          Rbi what is your situation re weight ?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            oslin said change in the types of foods a person eats, and in how well the body uses insulin, along with changes in glucose (sugar) production in the liver all likely contribute to the improvement in type 2 diabetes.
                            The current study included more than 1,100 people who had gastric bypass in hospitals in Northern Denmark. The surgeries took place between 2006 and 2015.
                            Researchers compared the patients who had surgery to nearly 1,100 type 2 diabetics who didn't.
                            Sixty-five percent of the surgical patients went into diabetes remission within six months. A year after surgery, 74 percent had remission of their type 2 diabetes, the study found. During the first five years after surgery, the remission rate remained at 70 percent or higher.
                            However, people in the study who were on insulin before the surgery were less likely to go into remission. People who had less control of their blood sugar levels were also less likely to do so. People over 60 also had more trouble attaining remission compared to people under 40.
                            Those who had type 2 diabetes for a shorter time (fewer than 2.6 years) were more likely to achieve remission.
                            As time passed, some people's diabetes returned. In the second year, 6 percent relapsed. During the third year, that figure drifted up to 12 percent and by five years, 27 percent had relapsed.
                            Still, the benefits from the surgery cannot be overlooked. "Bariatric surgery is a real treatment for type 2 diabetes, and it has been underutilized," Roslin said.
                            He said one of the most important findings was how well the surgery reduced the risk of many diabetes complications.
                            "People are scared of diabetes," Roslin noted. "They're scared of the blindness and the amputations, and this study shows that bariatric surgery is a treatment that may reduce those complications by 50 percent."
                            Findings were published Feb. 6 in Diabetologia.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Diabetes is not a black and white disease. In the past, it was divided into type 1(Sometimes called Juvenal diabetes)and type 2 (sometimes called adult onset diabetes). Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune condition which destroys beta cells in the pancreas so that eventually no insulin Is produced and exogenous insulin is required to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes is caused by Developing insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, fat, and liver don’t respond well to insulin and can’t use glucose from your blood for energy. Type 2s that have developed significant resistance are unable to produce enough insulin to overcome the resistance and need to introduce exogenous insulin to off-set the resistance.

                              As with most diseases, there are degrees of Type 2 diabetes so, accordingly, one size does not fit all. Some type 2s are able to control their diabetes with diet and exercise. Others with more severe resistance require exogenous insulin or a combination of insulin and medication while others with severe resistance combined with a pancreas that produces little or no insulin require a significant amount of exogenous insulin, often more than a type 1 diabetic.

                              I, unfortunately, fall into the later category. For the first few years after diagnosis, I was treated with diet and oral medications (zetia and Metformin) which eventually was not enough to prevent high blood sugar levels and was prescribed fast acting insulin to cover carbohydrate consumption (Bolus insulin) and subsequently slow acting insulin was added to cover between meal needs (basal insulin.) However, as my condition continued to worsen, Eight years ago I was prescribed an insulin pump that automatically controls basal insulin needs based on preset patterns and allows me to set Bolus insulin needs with the click of a button.

                              As indicated above, type 2 diabetes comes in all forms and degrees and It’s treatment needs to be determined on a case by case basis.

                              In addition to types 1 and 2, there is now type 1.5.
                              Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slow-progressing form of autoimmune diabetes. Like the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes, LADA occurs because your pancreas stops producing adequate insulin, most likely from some "insult" that slowly damages the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.

                              At this point, I won’t get into pre-diabetes.


                              Last edited by not2big; 07-19-2020, 12:31 PM.
                              Valued Member of 11+ years at the PEGym

                              12/'09 (start) NBP EL - 4.5, EG - 4.4
                              12/11 NBPEL - 5.1, MSEG - 5
                              01/13 NBPEL - 5.35, MSEG - 5.1
                              01/14 NBPEL - 5.35, MSEG - 5.25
                              01/16 NBPEL - 5.4, MSEG - 5.5
                              Fat Pad = 1+/-

                              Real cars have two seats. Everything else is a bus.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X