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  • Diet and life span

    So good evidence calorie restriction is good for ife span in rats . In monkies or humans it gets slushy .

    Anyone got good quality large scale studies with any actual evidence of life extension from fasting ,substantive calorie restrict and the like .
    I csomean see evidence of improvemnet in some health issues but that is not the same thing.

  • #2
    If there is anything out there, I would bet it could be found referenced somewhere on Mark Sisson's site. Not too far back he wrote about some work being done at University of So Cal (USC) on fasting and longevity.

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    • #3
      I studied longevity pretty deep in the recent past when we were working on therapeutics for longevity. We poured over data collected on people who lived long lives all over the world. The data is ALL over the board - good eaters, bad eaters; non-drinkers, regular drinkers; smokers, non-smokers, etc. A few things stick in my mind for these folks - most led far from perfect lives, lots of them love beer, a number have a love of bacon, most did things in relative moderation, getting good sleep was common, and most seemed to be active, happy people.

      Our conclusion - the most consistent predictor for longevity is genetics. And that's the direction therapeutic development is going - gene therapy.
      Start: BPEL 6.75', EG 5.8", BPFL 4.5", FG 4.7", BPFSL 7.0"
      05/2021: BPEL 7.65, EG 6.0, BPFL 5.8, FG 5.0", BPFSL 8.0"
      Goal: BPEL 8.0", EG 6.0", BPFL 5.75" FG 5.0", BPFSL 8.5"

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      • #4
        Genetics has and will always be the key. Proper life style may give you a few more months and you will die healthier but you will die and your genes know the time.
        The world's still a toy if you just stay a boy!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Pegasus View Post
          So good evidence calorie restriction is good for ife span in rats . In monkies or humans it gets slushy .

          Anyone got good quality large scale studies with any actual evidence of life extension from fasting ,substantive calorie restrict and the like .
          How about one of those real life experiments.



          veganism meets that criteria... of fasting ,substantive calorie restrict and the like



          you end up aging 5x times as fast....
          fruit and vegetables are bad for any human.

          that is the only things vegans managed to prove ...


          when you mean "fasting calorie restrict and the like" you mean starving ones self correct?

          starving ones self will shorten the life span esp if one starves them self's to death.....



          Comment


          • #6
            This is not as robust as the studies on rats and the restriction is severe but never the less is supportive .

            The rhesus monkey study ( 2 ) involved 46 male and 30 female rhesus macaques (aged 7–14 years at the start of the study), randomized to receive a control diet regimen or a 30% CR regimen and followed for 20 years. Each CR animal's baseline energy intake was reduced by 10% each month over a 3 month period and then maintained for the duration of the study to achieve the desired 30% CR. The CR regimen reduced the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease and brain atrophy, and 80% of the CR animals were still alive compared with 50% of the controls at the time of the report.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CUSP82 View Post
              Genetics has and will always be the key. Proper life style may give you a few more months and you will die healthier but you will die and your genes know the time.
              Life expectancy all ready peaked in 2014 and in a decline....


              Gen Z and Gen alphia are excepted to die in their 50's-60 early 70s or before their parents do, based on current obesity trends..

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              • #8
                Despite her reservations about recommending CR, Anderson praised the work of the research team in the Science Translational Medicine study for “pushing this forward for possible application in clinics.” In that study, test subjects followed a carefully designed 50 percent calorie restricted diet (totaling about 1,100 calories on the first day and 70 percent (about 700 calories) on the next four days, then ate whatever they wanted for the rest of the month.
                Longo, the gerontologist at U.S.C., says the underlying theory of the on-again/off-again approach is that the regenerative effects of the regimen occur not so much from the fasting itself as from the recovery afterward. By contrast, long-term, uninterrupted calorie restriction can lead to the sort of negative effects seen in extreme conditions like anorexia.

                The calorie-restricted diet in Longo’s study was 100 percent plant-based and featured vegetable soups, energy bars, energy drinks and a chip snack as well as mineral and vitamin supplements. It included nutrients designed to manipulate the expression of genes involved in aging-related processes, Longo explains. (Longo and U.S.C. are both owners of L-Nutra, the company that manufactures the diet. But he says he takes no salary or consulting fees from the company and has assigned his shares to a nonprofit organization established to support further research.)
                Even the five-day-a-month calorie restriction regimen was apparently a struggle for some test subjects, resulting in a 25 percent dropout rate. But health benefits in the form of decreased body mass and better levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, along with other factors, showed up after the third month and persisted for at least three months—even after subjects had returned full-time to a normal diet. Notably, given concerns about other forms of calorie restriction, lean muscle mass remained unchanged.
                The benefits were greater for people who were obese or otherwise unhealthy, Longo says. But those individuals might also need to repeat the five-day regimen as often as once a month to the point of recovery, he adds, whereas individuals who are already healthy and athletic might repeat it just twice a year.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pegasus View Post
                  Despite her reservations about recommending CR, Anderson praised the work of the research team in the Science Translational Medicine study for “pushing this forward for possible application in clinics.” In that study, test subjects followed a carefully designed 50 percent calorie restricted diet (totaling about 1,100 calories on the first day and 70 percent (about 700 calories) on the next four days, then ate whatever they wanted for the rest of the month.
                  Longo, the gerontologist at U.S.C., says the underlying theory of the on-again/off-again approach is that the regenerative effects of the regimen occur not so much from the fasting itself as from the recovery afterward. By contrast, long-term, uninterrupted calorie restriction can lead to the sort of negative effects seen in extreme conditions like anorexia.

                  The calorie-restricted diet in Longo’s study was 100 percent plant-based and featured vegetable soups, energy bars, energy drinks and a chip snack as well as mineral and vitamin supplements. It included nutrients designed to manipulate the expression of genes involved in aging-related processes, Longo explains. (Longo and U.S.C. are both owners of L-Nutra, the company that manufactures the diet. But he says he takes no salary or consulting fees from the company and has assigned his shares to a nonprofit organization established to support further research.)
                  Even the five-day-a-month calorie restriction regimen was apparently a struggle for some test subjects, resulting in a 25 percent dropout rate. But health benefits in the form of decreased body mass and better levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, along with other factors, showed up after the third month and persisted for at least three months—even after subjects had returned full-time to a normal diet. Notably, given concerns about other forms of calorie restriction, lean muscle mass remained unchanged.
                  The benefits were greater for people who were obese or otherwise unhealthy, Longo says. But those individuals might also need to repeat the five-day regimen as often as once a month to the point of recovery, he adds, whereas individuals who are already healthy and athletic might repeat it just twice a year.


                  eating plants and intentionally starving your self puts a lot of physical/mental stress on the body and deterioration...


                  Dr. Valter Longo, claims the standard american diet is the best diet 90% plants 10% meat... and we know how well that is doing nothing but obesity, heart issues and diseases, mental issues...


                  Originally posted by Pegasus View Post

                  100 percent plant-based and featured vegetable soups, energy bars, energy drinks and a chip snack .
                  that is the definition of the SAD



                  Yo-yo dieting at it's finest
                  Last edited by Thick_Unit; 06-15-2021, 11:37 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Hey Unit are you ever going to get it through your thick head that what causes obesity is not what you eat but how much you eat!
                    The world's still a toy if you just stay a boy!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CUSP82 View Post
                      Hey Unit are you ever going to get it through your thick head that what causes obesity is not what you eat but how much you eat!
                      and what causes extreme hunger ??? eating plants ....


                      if you ate something with actual HIGH density nutritional value (all ready bio available) one would not even have to go on a diet....


                      HIGH density nutritional value eliminates the "hunger" signals there by eliminating the bad "empty" fats naturally.. the net loss of muscle mass would be zero to most likely gaining muscle mass..


                      HIGH density nutritional value consumption does not put you in "starvation mode". which will cause additional weight gain of fat.. once you leave the 'diet'. it's nothing but a diet fad and highly unsustainable..

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Extreme hunger? I never had that? Is is fattening? You see a mature intelligent thinking man when he feels hungry decides what he wants to eat. If he is at the weight he feels good at well he could have some chocolate cake or a greasy burger with onions and fries. If he feels he needs to lose a few pounds well maybe he'll have an apple or banana and he's content for a few hours.
                        Now the self indulgent ,man/ child has the burger, fries, cake and an apple and he still wants more because he acts like a child with no discipline and gets fat.
                        Which one are you?
                        The world's still a toy if you just stay a boy!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CUSP82 View Post
                          Extreme hunger? I never had that? Is is fattening? You see a mature intelligent thinking man when he feels hungry decides what he wants to eat. If he is at the weight he feels good at well he could have some chocolate cake or a greasy burger with onions and fries. If he feels he needs to lose a few pounds well maybe he'll have an apple or banana and he's content for a few hours.
                          Now the self indulgent ,man/ child has the burger, fries, cake and an apple and he still wants more because he acts like a child with no discipline and gets fat.
                          Which one are you?
                          the standard american diet is snacking all day based if you're snacking all day it means one is hungry. All day...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Physdoc View Post
                            I studied longevity pretty deep in the recent past when we were working on therapeutics for longevity. We poured over data collected on people who lived long lives all over the world. The data is ALL over the board - good eaters, bad eaters; non-drinkers, regular drinkers; smokers, non-smokers, etc. A few things stick in my mind for these folks - most led far from perfect lives, lots of them love beer, a number have a love of bacon, most did things in relative moderation, getting good sleep was common, and most seemed to be active, happy people.

                            Our conclusion - the most consistent predictor for longevity is genetics. And that's the direction therapeutic development is going - gene therapy.
                            Every species has it's own species specific diet.. eating the wrong diet will shorten the life span ...


                            Your are doctor as you claim.. tell us what the human digestive organs . once we know what those organs are it will point to the correct type of species specific diet. as they can be compared to other animals...

                            Are they alkaline or acidic.. Start with the stomach..
                            Last edited by Thick_Unit; 06-15-2021, 10:49 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              here was a U-shaped relationship between carbohydrate intake and mortality in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort, a finding that was consistent in the meta-analysis combining these data with those from the other cohorts. When assessing total carbohydrate without regard to specific food source, diets with high (>70%) or low (<40%) percentage of energy from carbohydrates were associated with increased mortality, with minimal risk observed between 50–55%. Low carbohydrate dietary patterns that replaced carbohydrate with animal-derived protein or fat were associated with greater mortality risk, whereas this association was inverse when energy from carbohydrate was replaced with plant-derived protein or fat. These findings were also corroborated in the meta-analysis.
                              Implications of all the available evidence
                              Our findings suggest a U-shaped relationship between life expectancy and overall carbohydrate intake, in which lifespan is greatest among people with 50–55% carbohydrate intake, a level that might be considered moderate in North America and Europe but low in other regions, such as Asia. These data provide further evidence that animal-based low carbohydrate diets, which are more prevalent in North American and European populations, should be discouraged. Alternatively, if restricting carbohydrate intake is a chosen approach for weight loss or cardiometabolic risk reduction, replacement of carbohydrates with predominantly plant-based fats and proteins could be considered as a long-term approach to promote healthy ageing.

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